Exposing Local Apps Publicly with Ngrok

Here’s a screenshot of something we’ve currently been working on:

It’s not available publicly yet, because it’s still in the early stages of development. The app, hosted locally on http://aspen.reservations.com/#/stay-dates, will redirect to a 404 page unless you have the app installed in your machine. As a programmer, the changes I’m making on the app is only accessible on my local computer. Other programmers will only be able to view the changes I’ve made if I push said changes and they download those updates on their machines.

Similarly, I’ll be redirected to an error page if I view the said app on my phone:

What if a tester or a product owner requests an impromptu demo of the app? What if they want to test it as is? Early constructive feedback is always nice. We can set up the app on their machine, but what if they’re working remotely? I’m pretty sure it would be a pain for them to install the development environment on their own. And what if they want to test it on their mobile phone? Having the environment installed on their computer doesn’t mean they can test the app on an actual phone.

Apparently there’s Ngrok. It’s a quick solution to publicly sharing local apps over the internet.

Here’s a screenshot of me trying out the free version:

And now I can test the app on my phone!

No installations needed on the tester / product owner / client side, just a single bash command from the programmer instead. So cool!

 

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Bumping Into Discovery Testing

Until recently, what I mostly knew about test-driven development was the concept of red-green-refactor, unit testing application code while building them from the bottom-up. Likewise, I also thought that mocking was only all about mocks, fakes, stubs, and spies, tools that assist us in faking integrations so we can focus on what we really need to test. Apparently there is so much more to TDD and mocks that many programmers do not put into use.

Justin Searls calls it discovery testing. It’s a practice that’s attempts to help us build carefully-designed features with focus, confidence, and mindfulness, in a top-down approach. It breaks feature stories down into smaller problems right from the very beginning and forces programmers to slow down a little bit, enough for them to be more thoughtful about the high-level design. It uses test doubles to guide the design, which shapes up a source tree of collaborators and logical leaf nodes as development go. It favors rewrites over refactors, and helps us become aware of nasty redundant coverage with our tests.

And it categorizes TDD as a soft skill, rather than a technical skill.

He talks about it in more depth in a series of videos, building Conway’s Game of Life (in Java) as a coding exercise. He’s also talked about how we are often using mocks the wrong way, and shared insight on how we can write programs better.

Discover testing is fascinating, and has a lot of great points going for it. I feel that it takes the concept of red-green-refactor further and drives long-term maintainable software right from the start. I want to be good at it eventually, and I know I’d initially have to practice it long enough to see how much actual impact it has.

Favorite Talks from Agile Testing Days 2017

There are two things that’s wonderful from last year’s Agile Testing Days conference talks: content focusing on other valuable stuff for testers and teams (not automation), and having as many women speakers as there are men. I hope they continue on with that trend.

Here’s a list of my favourite talks from said conference (enjoy!):

  • How To Tell People They Failed and Make Them Feel Great (by Liz Keogh, about Cynefin, our innate dislike of uncertainty and love of making things predictable, putting safety nets and allowing for failure, learning reviews, letting people change themselves, building robust probes, and making it a habit to come from a place of care)
  • Pivotal Moments (by Janet Gregory, on living in a dairy farm, volunteering, traveling, toastmasters, Lisa Crispin, Mary Poppindieck and going on adventures, sharing failures and taking help, and reflecting on pivotal moments)
  • Owning Our Narrative (by Angie Jones, on the history of the music industry so far, the changes in environment, tools, and business models musicians have had to go through so survive, and embracing changes and finding ways to fulfil our roles as software testers)
  • Learning Through Osmosis (by Maaret Pyhäjärvi, on mob programming and osmosis,  creating safe spaces to facilitate learning, and the power of changing some of our beliefs and behaviour)
  • There and Back Again: A Hobbit’s/Developer’s/Tester’s Journey (by Pete Walen, on how software was built in the old days, how testing and programming broke up into silos, and a challenge for both parties to go back at excelling at each other’s skills and teaming up
  • 10 Behaviours of Effective Agile Teams (by Rob Lambert, about shipping software and customer service, becoming a more effective employee, behaviours, and communicating well)

Cypress: Stubbing Network Requests with Cy.Route()

I very much enjoy testing web apps by simulating their network requests via code. This allows me to visit websites, login, and replicate functionality, all without a browser, a slightly different sort of testing than many testers are accustomed to. I love to explore what’s happening under the hood when we click elements and submit forms, I like to play with cookies and payloads, I try to find out what bare minimum of data do I need to pass through HTTP requests to recreate a particular user behavior. People often do this kind of testing with Postman but I’ve been accustomed to implementing tests with Ruby and the rest-client gem. Recently though I looked at how Cypress plays with network requests, especially curious about how they take it further with their built-in request stubbing feature using cy.route() because I have never tried stubbing before.

First, some context on HTTP requests:

  • GET requests often simulate visiting (or redirecting to) a web page or retrieving a resource (like an image or another file)
  • POST requests often simulate a form submission, like logins or payments, and as such deals with passing inputted data in order to proceed to the next application state
  • There are other types of HTTP requests but mastering how these two work is enough at the start

And here is an example of how Cypress helps you perform a said GET request:

and for a POST request:

Pretty straightforward and easy to follow. Notice that POST requests have more information in them than GET requests, since we’re passing data – the body field is concerned with user inputs while the headers field is concerned with the user session, among other things. Of course, both requests need a url field, some place to send the request to.

And when we send a request, we receive a response. That response tells us about how a web application behaved after the request – was the user redirected to another page? was the user able to log in? did an expected web element got displayed or hidden? were we sent to an error page, perhaps?

Cypress takes network requests further by introducing routing to testing. Here’s an example:

What the above code says is that we want to use Cypress as a server and we want to wait and listen for a POST request that’s going to the /login URL after a submit button (with an id of #submitButton) is clicked, after which we want to respond with a { success: false } result. This means that the actual response from our application from that url is going to be taken over by a fake response that we designed ourselves. This is what stubbing a network request looks like.

Now why would we want to do this? Some reasons:

  • We want to check how an application behaves for scenarios where a request fails to reach the application server. Do we redirect the user? Or do we show an error popup? Or does the application also work offline? To do this without stubbing, we would need some help from a programmer to shut down the app server at the right time after we perform the scenario.
  • We want to speed up tests by stubbing the response of some requests with less data than the actual responses deliver. We can even have the response data to be empty, if we don’t necessarily need that specific data for a test.
  • We want to see what happens to the application when it receives an incorrect response value from a request.

This is one thing I am loving about Cypress. Out of the box, they allow me to play with network requests alongside testing the user interface, and lets me tinker with it some more.

Dockerizing Our Legacy Apps: Some Notes

I spent the recent weeks of January tinkering with Docker in both Windows 7 and Mac OS. I played with it a lot because I thought it’s something that’s useful for a grand new project we have at work, and I thought that integrating our legacy application code to it would help me learn about it more. And the exercise did help me understand the tool better, including some nuances with application performance and database connections. I was able to dockerize our legacy apps too! 🙂

Some notes to remember related to the exercise:

  • Windows 7 Docker Toolbox and Docker for Mac has a performance issue with volume mounts through docker-compose. Legacy apps composed of a large number of files (especially with dependency directories) will run, but they will be painfully slow out-of-the-box. Fortunately for Docker for Mac users, docker-sync has an effective workaround for this problem. It involves running an in-sync container for the application code, separate from the docker-compose file. Unfortunately, I have not found any workarounds for said performance issue for Windows 7 (and perhaps Windows 8) Docker Toolbox users.
  • Often we have to update the host file of our server machine so that we can run applications locally using a distinct, easy-to-remember URL through a browser. This means we need to add extra hosts to necessary docker containers too if we dockerize our apps. We can do this by using the extra_hosts command in docker-compose.
  • The official Postgresql docker container does not include the pdo, pdo_pgsql, and pgsql drivers, which handles the connection between the application and the database. To install those drivers inside the official container, we’ll need to use a Dockerfile and build it from the docker-compose file with the build and context commands.
  • Sometimes we have a need to copy the Postgresql DB files from a running container to set up a proper volume mount of database data from host to container. We can copy that data by using the convenient docker cp <source> <destination> command. I had this work in Docker for Mac. However, for Windows 7 Docker Toolbox users, a docker container is unable to use such copied data, perhaps because of the difference in OS between host and container, so I had to resort to restoring and backing up data every time I start and stop my application containers.
  • As a tester, what Docker provides me is a convenient tool to test all sorts of interesting application configurations as much as I want to on a single machine, see if the apps break if I changed some service config, and find out which configurations work or not. I can add or remove a new service, or even update an existing service to a new version, like updating PHP from 5.6 to 7.1, and immediately see what impact it has on the apps themselves. These kinds of tests are often left to operations engineers, but I’m glad there is a now a way to do such tests on my own machine, before application changes even reach a dedicated testing server.
  • Even if Docker makes it easy to setup an application development environment from scratch with docker-compose and Dockerfiles, it is still important to maintain a wiki of the necessary machine configurations a programmer needs to perform in order to reset or build the apps with only a single command, or two. Subtle things like custom docker-compose files, .env and php.ini files, host files, Nginx configs, or turning long docker commands into shortcuts with shell scripts or make commands.
  • Makefile tasks can help put specific scripts into an easy-to-remember command with context. I assume Rakefile does the same thing in Ruby, or Jakefile in JavaScript.
  • Dockerizing our legacy apps pushed me on a discussion with programmers about the ways they run said applications on their machines. Most of them actually just test code changes directly on Staging or another available development server. That speaks about one habit we have as a development team, and likely the reason why our apps are a pain to setup locally.

6 Curious New Tools to Try for Writing Automated Checks for Browser Apps

While I don’t find myself writing a lot of browser-based automated checks these days, I still am on the look out for interesting new tools in that space. The reason: the new tool solves an existing problem I have with setting up such a testing suite from scratch or provides a solution for certain curious use cases I’ve never experienced before. While using Ruby and Watir together in writing tests running through the browser for me is sufficient for common tasks, such a new tool could be a better fit for another project.

Here’s a list of such tools that popped up in my feed in recent months:

  • Cypress. What I like about Cypress, aside from the standalone package installation option and the built-in pretty test report page, is that the pre-defined browser tests that the actual team runs on its own site is included out-of-the-box. This way they made it easy for me to write custom tests; I just had to search for an example of what I wanted to do, copy-pasted it to my own test, and updated the parts that needed changing. Tests are written in Javascript. I have yet to try running the tests via the terminal though, which is important when running tests on a CI server. Using their test runner is free for all projects, however there is a pricing plan for using their dashboard service which helps keep test recordings private.
  • Katalon Studio. This is a full-blown automation solution that is completely free. There’s a pricing plan for business support services. The record-and-playback feature built-in to the tool failed to impress me when I ran it through our legacy apps, but perhaps writing the actual test code through their GUI fares better (using which there will be a high learning curve for people like me who like to use the CLI and personally-configured IDEs).
  • PuppeteerBuild to control Google’s headless Chrome or Chromium browser, running over the DevTools protocol. Tests are written in Javascript. Easy to try and get into using their web playground. Alister Scott has tried it running with Mocha and Circle CI on a demo project.
  • Chromeless. Similar to Puppeteer, but built to automate an army of Chrome browsers running in parallel. It gives us the option to run tests on AWS Lamba too. Again, tests are written in Javascript, which we can try on their demo playground.
  • Laravel Dusk. This gives PHP developers familiar with Laravel the ability to write and run their own browser app tests, using a programming language they’re much accustomed to.
  • Appraise. Similar to BackstopJS, a tool for visually validating browsers apps. Tests are written in Markdown.

Using a Git Pre-Commit Hook for Automatic Linting, Unit Testing, and Code Standards Checking of Application Code

Problem: I want to automatically run unit tests, lint the application code, and check it’s state against team standards every time I try to commit my changes to a project. It would be nice if the commit aborts if any of the existing tests fails or if I did not follow a particular standard that the team agrees to uphold. The commit pushes through if there are no errors. If possible, I don’t have to change anything in my software development workflow.

Solution: Use a Git pre-commit hook. Under the .git/hooks hidden folder in the project directory, create a new file called pre-commit (without any file extension) containing something like the following bash script (for testing PHP code):

#!/bin/sh

stagedFiles=$(git diff-index --cached HEAD | grep ".php" | grep "^:" | sed 's:.*[DAM][ \\''t]*\([^ \\''t]*\):\1:g');
errorMessage="Please correct the errors above. Commit aborted."

printf "Linting and checking code standards ..."
for file in $stagedFiles
do
  php -l $file
  LINTVAL=$?
  if [[ $LINTVAL != 0 ]]
  then
    printf $errorMessage
    exit 1
  fi
  php core/phpcs.phar --colors --standard=phpcs.xml $file
  STANDVAL=$?
  if [[ $STANDVAL != 0 ]]
  then
    printf $errorMessage
    exit 1
  fi
done

printf "Running unit tests ..."
core/vendor/bin/phpunit --colors="always" [TESTS_DIRECTORY]
TESTSVAL=$?
if [[ $TESTSVAL != 0 ]]
then
  printf $errorMessage
  exit 1
fi

where

  • linting and code standard checks only runs for the files you want to commit changes to
  • code standard checks are based on a certain phpcs.xml file
  • unit tests inside a particular TESTS_DIRECTORY will run
  • the commit will abort whenever any of the lints, code standard checks, or unit tests fails