Five People and Their Thoughts (Part 6)

Some engaging articles I’d like to share today:

  • The Failures of ‘Intro to TDD’ (by Justin Searls, about classic test-driven development, code katas, what TDD’s primary benefit actually is, mocks, and discovery testing)
  • Branching is Easy. So? Git-flow Is Not Agile (by Camille Fournier, on Git, tooling, teams, developing software with agility, how easy it is to create feature branches with Git, and some reasons why you don’t need it)
  • What’s Wrong With Estimates? (by Yorgos Saslis, about estimates, why we are being asked to provide estimates, and the pitfalls of the ways we are using them)
  • A New Social Contract for Open Source (by Eran Hammer, on open-source, free code but paid time, sponsorship, making clear rules and specifying benefits, and sustainability)
  • Introducing Example Mapping (by Matt Wynne, about conversations to clarify and confirm acceptance criteria, feedback, colored index cards, and the benefits of writing examples when exploring a problem domain)
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Bumping Into Discovery Testing

Until recently, what I mostly knew about test-driven development was the concept of red-green-refactor, unit testing application code while building them from the bottom-up. Likewise, I also thought that mocking was only all about mocks, fakes, stubs, and spies, tools that assist us in faking integrations so we can focus on what we really need to test. Apparently there is so much more to TDD and mocks that many programmers do not put into use.

Justin Searls calls it discovery testing. It’s a practice that’s attempts to help us build carefully-designed features with focus, confidence, and mindfulness, in a top-down approach. It breaks feature stories down into smaller problems right from the very beginning and forces programmers to slow down a little bit, enough for them to be more thoughtful about the high-level design. It uses test doubles to guide the design, which shapes up a source tree of collaborators and logical leaf nodes as development go. It favors rewrites over refactors, and helps us become aware of nasty redundant coverage with our tests.

And it categorizes TDD as a soft skill, rather than a technical skill.

He talks about it in more depth in a series of videos, building Conway’s Game of Life (in Java) as a coding exercise. He’s also talked about how we are often using mocks the wrong way, and shared insight on how we can write programs better.

Discover testing is fascinating, and has a lot of great points going for it. I feel that it takes the concept of red-green-refactor further and drives long-term maintainable software right from the start. I want to be good at it eventually, and I know I’d initially have to practice it long enough to see how much actual impact it has.

Three Recommended Paid Software Testing Online Courses

Free online courses are nice, but some paid ones are just better at delivering value especially when instructors take a lot of care about building the best possible content they can provide to their audience. Free is always an option, but the problem with free is that we don’t necessarily have to give anything back in return for a service. We can do nothing and that’s okay. With paid courses however I find myself to be more motivated to take in everything I can. I focus more and I believe that helps me learn better.

Here are three recommended paid software testing courses I’ve taken recently, from which I’ve learned a great deal: