Lessons Learned from Richard Bach’s “Curious Lives: Adventures from the Ferret Chronicles”

I always start the new year like most people, spending quality time with friends and family, some reflection and goal setting, with good food, many cheers, and hearty laughs. I also often choose a wonderful book or two to go on an adventure with during the holidays, because it is always worth the while. This time, I got lucky finding a paperback copy of an old Richard Bach collection, titled “Curious Lives: Adventures from the Ferret Chronicles”, was glad to meet up with ferret friends, old and new both, and got valuable reminders about the courtesies and living accordingly to our highest sense of right, along with the fun ride.

Here are my favorite lines from the book:

  • Whatever harm I would do to another, I shall do first to myself. As I respect and am kind to myself, so shall I respect and be kind to peers, to elders, to kits. I claim for others the freedom to live as they wish, to think and believe as they will. I claim that freedom for myself. I shall make each choice and live each day to my highest sense of right.
  • Once, long ago, we changed our minds: end violence. In its place, no matter what: courtesy.
  • If you excel at your craft, there is a good chance that curious ferrets will need to know why, to find out what makes you different.
  • With the adventures we choose and the mysteries we solve we build our own credentials, write our own introduction to others around the world who value adventure and mystery themselves.
  • Trust. There’s a light, when we close our eyes, the light of what we want to do more than anything else in the world. Trust that light. Follow, wherever it leads.
  • Giving our visions and stories and characters to become friends to others lifts not only ourselves but the world and all its futures.
  • “There’s a time to work on a book and you know it,” said the muse. “There’s a time to think about the story, a time to care about your readers, your publisher, about rhythm and timing and grammar and spelling and punctuation, about design and advertising and publicity. But none of those times, Budgeron, is when you’re writing!”
  • Her husband had told her long ago that she didn’t need to please everyone with her stories – if a book pleases only half of one percent of the reading public, though no one else bought a single copy, it will be a massive bestseller.
  • Budgeron Ferret had chosen to be a writer. With his choice came poverty, loneliness, rejection, frustration, despair, perseverance, delight, attention, riches, love, understanding, fulfilment, a life of ideas that mattered to him, shared now and then with kings and kits.
  • How strange, he thought. Find the greatest teachers, ask the hardest questions, they never say, ‘Study philosophy’, or, ‘Get your degree’. They say, ‘You already know’.
  • The mark of true flight is not our altitude but our attitude, not our speed but our joy in the paths we find above the earth.
  • No one taught her, but she knew: more important than talent or gifts or education is the determination to make one’s wish come true.
  • “Vink, if you want to meet the one ferret who can fix any trouble, no matter how bad it is, the one who can bring you happiness when nobody else can do it – why, just look in the mirror and say hello.”
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Lessons from Richard Bach’s “Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah”

Richard Bach’sIllusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah” is a most treasured book from all the books I have read so far. It is a short book, something that can definitely be digested for an hour or a few, but it doesn’t fall short of inspiring and thought-provoking passages, and questions. I have always kept a copy close because it’s what I often choose to rummage through whenever I feel totally sluggish or disheartened, never failing to provide a good pick-me-up or occasionally giving a disapproving eye when needed.

Here are some favorite lessons from the book, which I remind myself every now and again:

  • Learning is finding out what you already know. Doing is demonstrating that you know it. Teaching is reminding others that they know just as well as you. You are all learners, doers, teachers.
  • The simplest questions are the most profound. Where were you born? Where is your home? Where are you going? What are you doing? Think about these once in a while, and watch your answers change.
  • You are led through your lifetime by the inner learning creature, the playful spiritual being that is your real self. Don’t turn away from possible futures before you’re certain you don’t have anything to learn from them. You’re always free to change your mind and choose a different future, or a different past.
  • There is no such thing as a problem without a gift for you in its hands. You seek problems because you need their gifts.
  • The bond that links your true family is not one of blood, but of respect and joy in each other’s life. Rarely do members of one family grow up under the same roof.
  • If you learn what this world is, how it works, you automatically start getting miracles, what will be called miracles. But of course nothing is miraculous. Learn what the magician knows and it’s not magic anymore.
  • Isn’t it strange how much we know if only we ask ourselves instead of somebody else?
  • If you will practice being fictional for a while, you will understand that fictional characters are sometimes more real than people with bodies and heartbeats.
  • Like attracts like. Just be who you are, calm and clear and bright. Automatically, as we shine who we are, asking ourselves every minute is this what I really want to do, doing it only when we answer yes, automatically that turns away those who have nothing to learn from who we are and attracts those who do, and from whom we have to learn, as well.
  • The world is your exercise-book, the pages on which you do your sums. It is not reality, although you can express reality there if you wish. You are also free to write nonsense, or lies, or to tear the pages.
  • Within each of us lies the power of our consent to health and to sickness, to riches and to poverty, to freedom and to slavery. It is we who control these, and not another.
  • There is no good and there is no evil, outside of what makes as happy and what makes us unhappy.
  • If you want freedom and joy so much, can’t you see it’s not anywhere outside of you? Say you have it, and you have it! Act as if it’s yours, and it is!
  • We are game-playing, fun-having creatures, we are the otters of the universe. We cannot die, we cannot hurt ourselves any more than illusions on the screen can be hurt. But we can believe we’re hurt, in whatever agonizing detail we want. We can believe we’re victims, killed and killing, shuddered around by good luck and bad luck.
  • Why are we here? For fun and learning. It’s the same reason why people see films, for fun or for learning or for both together.

Fun fact: One of Richard Bach’s sons is James Marcus Bach, a software tester.