A Design Problem

This weekend, while in the middle of a deep dive into the practice of discovery testing on a personal project, I realised that there are different ways of building software from the ground up. That’s actually obvious because there are various programming languages and there are tons of frameworks for quickly constructing apps and sites. It’s literally never been easier to write software from scratch. But simple to start doesn’t mean that what we create turns out to be something that’s easy to maintain or extend, even if the team decides to write more tests or use more tools to monitor the sanity of the codebase. Even if user stories are clear and there’s enough capacity for testing, it can still be difficult to deliver changes without a hitch and on schedule, when the code makes it hard to do so.

For many testers and product owners who have never before looked at the code that runs the apps they test, it may be tough to see how simple feature requests take too long. It can be mind-boggling why bugs continue to creep in. We tend to just accept things as is. Finding out why is one reason I learned how to read and write code myself, besides the desire to have better communication with the devs I work with and having the ability to write my own tools to augment how I test. And after having been writing test code for a number of years now I can say that translating ideas into new code can be easy, but revising existing code to accommodate new business rules is often  troublesome. That means, at least for me, that I have a problem about the way I am writing code for the long haul, even if my app is working at present. I can imagine other programmers having the same predicament.

I now understand that writing long-term, maintainable, software is essentially a design problem. And it seems that a lot of us needs to up our skills in that area.

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Doing Things Right, And Doing The Right Things

In testing software, automation is a tool that helps us re-run whatever repeatable checks we have on an application under test. We automate because we never have enough time to re-test everything by hand, and exploring the unknown parts of the apps we test is a far better use of our testing skills than following scripts. To automate is doing one thing right, within context, if it provides us the feedback we need. And that feedback we think we need from automation depends on what suites of tests are best repeated again and again, as well as what sort of tests costs more than the value they give.

There’s also tons of tools that helps us build good quality software. Even though we build more complex applications now than before, we have frameworks, libraries, intelligent IDEs, and other tools to help us spin up apps on a whim now too, ready to be modified as we see fit. Choosing the proper tools for the job is doing another thing right. But before we write any code, we need to be sure about the actual problem we are solving for our customer.

Yes, we need to do things right, from the get go if possible. They help us progress from one point to another faster than otherwise. However, I think it’s more important that we continuously take the necessary time to review whether we are doing the right things too, more important to actually get feedback and solve problems than merely adding tests and features.

When It’s a Burden to Update a Test (or System) Code

If it feels difficult, exhausting, and inconvenient to update an existing test (or system) code, it may be that you don’t completely understand what the code does or it may be that the code really is written badly. Either way both situations present a learning opportunity: the former to fully grasp the business rules for the particular code you want to change, the latter to review the purpose of the code and to rewrite it in a way that’s helpful to the team.

Complaining doesn’t help; it only prolongs the agony. Care instead, discuss with the team to check if the change is actually necessary, and, if you think that it is, leave the code better than when you found it.