Favorite Talks from Selenium Conference Austin 2017

It’s amazing that the recently concluded Selenium Conference over at Austin Texas continues to live up to expectations, building up on the previous conferences and keeps delivering quality talks on automation and testing. And what’s more interesting is to know how they’ve been keeping up with everything with help from the Software Freedom Conservancy and the testing community. There’s even a European Selenium Conference happening on October 9-10, which I’m very much looking forward to.

Meanwhile, here are some of my favorite talks from the Austin conference:

  • Automate Windows and Mac Apps with the WebDriver Protocol (by Dan Cuellar, Yosef Durr, and Stuart Russell, about easily automating Windows and Mac apps using Appium)
  • Automating Restaurant POS with Selenium – A Case Study (by Jeffrey Payne, about automating a point-of-sale system for testing, including credit card readers, printers, cash drawers, and caller IDs)
  • Selenium State of the Union (by Simon Stewart, on an overview of the W3C spec process and about naming things in the Selenium project, how APIs should be correct and how people won’t write their own, how not everyone is a sophisticated developer, and how testing is under resourced)
  • Leverage your Load Tests with JMeter and Selenium Grid (by Christina Thalayasingam, on adding load tests for your system using JMeter and Selenium Grid in combination)
  • Selenium and the Software Freedom Conservancy (by Karen Sandler, on the safety and efficacy of proprietary medical devices and how often open-source software are more likely to be safer and better over time, and about what kind of organization the Software Freedom Conservancy is and how it helps open-source projects like Selenium continue to live on for the long-term)
  • Stop Inspecting, Start Glancing (by Dan Gilkerson, on automating web apps without looking at the DOM structure)
  • Transformative Culture (by Ashley Hunsberger, about moving from QA to Engineering Productivity and the culture changes necessary for getting better at testing)