Favorite Talks from Selenium Conference Austin 2017

It’s amazing that the recently concluded Selenium Conference over at Austin Texas continues to live up to expectations, building up on the previous conferences and keeps delivering quality talks on automation and testing. And what’s more interesting is to know how they’ve been keeping up with everything with help from the Software Freedom Conservancy and the testing community. There’s even a European Selenium Conference happening on October 9-10, which I’m very much looking forward to.

Meanwhile, here are some of my favorite talks from the Austin conference:

  • Automate Windows and Mac Apps with the WebDriver Protocol (by Dan Cuellar, Yosef Durr, and Stuart Russell, about easily automating Windows and Mac apps using Appium)
  • Automating Restaurant POS with Selenium – A Case Study (by Jeffrey Payne, about automating a point-of-sale system for testing, including credit card readers, printers, cash drawers, and caller IDs)
  • Selenium State of the Union (by Simon Stewart, on an overview of the W3C spec process and about naming things in the Selenium project, how APIs should be correct and how people won’t write their own, how not everyone is a sophisticated developer, and how testing is under resourced)
  • Leverage your Load Tests with JMeter and Selenium Grid (by Christina Thalayasingam, on adding load tests for your system using JMeter and Selenium Grid in combination)
  • Selenium and the Software Freedom Conservancy (by Karen Sandler, on the safety and efficacy of proprietary medical devices and how often open-source software are more likely to be safer and better over time, and about what kind of organization the Software Freedom Conservancy is and how it helps open-source projects like Selenium continue to live on for the long-term)
  • Stop Inspecting, Start Glancing (by Dan Gilkerson, on automating web apps without looking at the DOM structure)
  • Transformative Culture (by Ashley Hunsberger, about moving from QA to Engineering Productivity and the culture changes necessary for getting better at testing)

Favorite Talks from Agile Testing Days 2016

One of the great ways to be updated with what’s happening in the testing community is to attend software testing conferences, talk to the speakers and attendees, and ask questions. But if you don’t have the budget to fly over to where the conference is (like me), the next best thing is to wait for the conference recordings to be uploaded online. That’s how I’ve kept up with the latest news in test automation, following both the Selenium Conference and Google’s Test Automation Conference. All these recordings on YouTube paints a picture of what experiences and opportunities are currently out there for software testers.

And recently, I decided to free some time to follow Agile Testing Days and see what went on over at Potsdam, Germany. It was my way of checking out what’s happening in the agile testing community someplace far away from where I am. And today I’d like to share some of my favorite talks from that event:

  • Designed to Learn (by Melissa Perri, about testing product ideas, experiments and safe spaces for them, and learning what customers want and need)
  • Snow White and the 777.777.777 Dwarfs (by Gojko Adzic, about factors that may likely change testing policies and practices in the coming years as a result of computing power getting cheaper, such as third party platforms, per-request payments, multi-versioning, machine learning, mutation and approval testing, testing after deployment and failure budgets)
  • Continuous Delivery Anti-Patterns (by Jeff ‘Cheezy’ Morgan, on eliminating branches, test data management, stable environments, and keeping code quality high)
  • NoEstimates (by Vasco Duarte, about leaving out estimation in software development projects)
  • From Waterfall to Agile, The Advantage Is Clear (by Michael ‘The Wanz’ Wansley, on software testers being gatekeepers of quality, growing up in a waterfall system, and the wonderful experience that is software testing)