Favorite Talks from Agile Testing Days 2017

There are two things that’s wonderful from last year’s Agile Testing Days conference talks: content focusing on other valuable stuff for testers and teams (not automation), and having as many women speakers as there are men. I hope they continue on with that trend.

Here’s a list of my favourite talks from said conference (enjoy!):

  • How To Tell People They Failed and Make Them Feel Great (by Liz Keogh, about Cynefin, our innate dislike of uncertainty and love of making things predictable, putting safety nets and allowing for failure, learning reviews, letting people change themselves, building robust probes, and making it a habit to come from a place of care)
  • Pivotal Moments (by Janet Gregory, on living in a dairy farm, volunteering, traveling, toastmasters, Lisa Crispin, Mary Poppindieck and going on adventures, sharing failures and taking help, and reflecting on pivotal moments)
  • Owning Our Narrative (by Angie Jones, on the history of the music industry so far, the changes in environment, tools, and business models musicians have had to go through so survive, and embracing changes and finding ways to fulfil our roles as software testers)
  • Learning Through Osmosis (by Maaret Pyhäjärvi, on mob programming and osmosis,  creating safe spaces to facilitate learning, and the power of changing some of our beliefs and behaviour)
  • There and Back Again: A Hobbit’s/Developer’s/Tester’s Journey (by Pete Walen, on how software was built in the old days, how testing and programming broke up into silos, and a challenge for both parties to go back at excelling at each other’s skills and teaming up
  • 10 Behaviours of Effective Agile Teams (by Rob Lambert, about shipping software and customer service, becoming a more effective employee, behaviours, and communicating well)
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Favorite Talks from Agile Testing Days 2016

One of the great ways to be updated with what’s happening in the testing community is to attend software testing conferences, talk to the speakers and attendees, and ask questions. But if you don’t have the budget to fly over to where the conference is (like me), the next best thing is to wait for the conference recordings to be uploaded online. That’s how I’ve kept up with the latest news in test automation, following both the Selenium Conference and Google’s Test Automation Conference. All these recordings on YouTube paints a picture of what experiences and opportunities are currently out there for software testers.

And recently, I decided to free some time to follow Agile Testing Days and see what went on over at Potsdam, Germany. It was my way of checking out what’s happening in the agile testing community someplace far away from where I am. And today I’d like to share some of my favorite talks from that event:

  • Designed to Learn (by Melissa Perri, about testing product ideas, experiments and safe spaces for them, and learning what customers want and need)
  • Snow White and the 777.777.777 Dwarfs (by Gojko Adzic, about factors that may likely change testing policies and practices in the coming years as a result of computing power getting cheaper, such as third party platforms, per-request payments, multi-versioning, machine learning, mutation and approval testing, testing after deployment and failure budgets)
  • Continuous Delivery Anti-Patterns (by Jeff ‘Cheezy’ Morgan, on eliminating branches, test data management, stable environments, and keeping code quality high)
  • NoEstimates (by Vasco Duarte, about leaving out estimation in software development projects)
  • From Waterfall to Agile, The Advantage Is Clear (by Michael ‘The Wanz’ Wansley, on software testers being gatekeepers of quality, growing up in a waterfall system, and the wonderful experience that is software testing)