6 Curious New Tools to Try for Writing Automated Checks for Browser Apps

While I don’t find myself writing a lot of browser-based automated checks these days, I still am on the look out for interesting new tools in that space. The reason: the new tool solves an existing problem I have with setting up such a testing suite from scratch or provides a solution for certain curious use cases I’ve never experienced before. While using Ruby and Watir together in writing tests running through the browser for me is sufficient for common tasks, such a new tool could be a better fit for another project.

Here’s a list of such tools that popped up in my feed in recent months:

  • Cypress. What I like about Cypress, aside from the standalone package installation option and the built-in pretty test report page, is that the pre-defined browser tests that the actual team runs on its own site is included out-of-the-box. This way they made it easy for me to write custom tests; I just had to search for an example of what I wanted to do, copy-pasted it to my own test, and updated the parts that needed changing. Tests are written in Javascript. I have yet to try running the tests via the terminal though, which is important when running tests on a CI server. Using their test runner is free for all projects, however there is a pricing plan for using their dashboard service which helps keep test recordings private.
  • Katalon Studio. This is a full-blown automation solution that is completely free. There’s a pricing plan for business support services. The record-and-playback feature built-in to the tool failed to impress me when I ran it through our legacy apps, but perhaps writing the actual test code through their GUI fares better (using which there will be a high learning curve for people like me who like to use the CLI and personally-configured IDEs).
  • PuppeteerBuild to control Google’s headless Chrome or Chromium browser, running over the DevTools protocol. Tests are written in Javascript. Easy to try and get into using their web playground. Alister Scott has tried it running with Mocha and Circle CI on a demo project.
  • Chromeless. Similar to Puppeteer, but built to automate an army of Chrome browsers running in parallel. It gives us the option to run tests on AWS Lamba too. Again, tests are written in Javascript, which we can try on their demo playground.
  • Laravel Dusk. This gives PHP developers familiar with Laravel the ability to write and run their own browser app tests, using a programming language they’re much accustomed to.
  • Appraise. Similar to BackstopJS, a tool for visually validating browsers apps. Tests are written in Markdown.
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