Being Reminded of All the Phases I’ve So Far Had in Writing Automated Checks

I’m currently in the midst of a test code overhaul, a re-writing project of sorts. It started about a week ago and so far I’ve made considerable progress on what I’ve wanted to achieve with the rewrite, which is basically cleaner and more maintainable code, mostly in the sense of test data management and test description language. The number of tests running everyday in our Jenkins system has grown noticeably and I’ve felt that it’s been difficult to add certain tests because of how I structured the test data in the past, which I have not upgraded since then. The two possible avenues for running tests – on the UI and HTTP layers – also adds a bit of complexity and it’d be nice if I can integrate the two smoothly. It’s an interesting development because I did not plan on any re-writing to be done anytime soon but I guess at the back of my mind I knew it’ll happen eventually. And so I decided to take a step back from writing more tests and do some cleanup before it gets tougher to change things. I plan to finish everything in about a month or so.

At the moment, I’m reminded of the phases I’ve gone through in learning to code and writing automated checks in the past few years:

  • Early 2014. It all begins with Selenium IDE, with giving the self some time to study the basic Selenese commands for writing automated checks and (more importantly) understand how to properly retrieve the page elements you want to manipulate.
  • Mid 2014. Test management in Selenium IDE becomes difficult as the number of tests grow, hence the decision to switch to Selenium WebDriver. The only programming language background I had back then was C++, which was limited to only functions and logical/conditional operators, so I chose Java to work with to lessen the learning curve.
  • Late 2014. Familiarized myself with Git, which hooked me on making daily commits and appreciating version control. Along the way I learned the concepts of classes and objects.
  • All of 2015 up to Early 2016. I was in a trance, writing code daily and pushing myself to create all the automated checks that I wanted to run for our apps before every release. Tests run on the Eclipse IDE using TestNG and I was happy with what I had, except that those end-to-end tests are really slow. Running everything took overnight to finish, which was okay for my employer but annoying for me personally.
  • Mid 2016. Re-writing existing tests in Ruby with Cucumber integration started off (when I found Jeff Morgan’s “Cucumber & Cheese” book online) as a side project for fun and testing my skill level in programming. And I did have buckets of fun! The experiment told me that there’s still a lot I need to practice on if I want to write better code, and it also told me that I can be more productive if I switch programming languages. There’s a bit less code to type in when writing code in Ruby than Java and I liked that, plus all the interesting libraries I can use. I switched to Sublime Text and used both Jenkins and the command-line interface more extensively too.
  • Late 2016. As I was looking for ways to speed up end-to-end tests total execution, which by then takes about 4 hours to complete, I ended up exploring testing apps in the HTTP layer instead of in the UI. That took a lot of studying of how our apps actually behave under the hood, what data are being passed around, how images are actually sent, how to view pages without a browser, how redirections work, among other things. After years of testing apps via the user interface, this was such a refreshing and valuable period, and I completely wondered why I never knew such a thing existed until then. It wasn’t being taught extensively to testers, perhaps because it all depends on how the app was structured to run through an API.

And these phases brings me to now, where there’s a healthy dose of API and UI layer tests all checking major app features. It’s all good, just several pieces needing a cleanup, a little parallelization, better test description language, and great documentation. It’s all good, because the lessons in both programming and testing keep piling. The two practices differ in mindset but I think they complement each other, and I think that there’s no reason anyone can’t do both.

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One thought on “Being Reminded of All the Phases I’ve So Far Had in Writing Automated Checks

  1. Pingback: Testing Bits – 5/14/17 – 5/20/17 | Testing Curator Blog

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