Lessons from Bernadette Jiwa’s “Difference”

Bernadette Jiwa does not specifically write about software testing or about software development but her writings always talk about how we should perform our work or how to run our businesses, general concepts that seem applicable to what we do too. Reading “Difference” was a treat, and the lessons she shares about what marketing really is are a bonus.

Some favorite lines from the book:

  • Do you need to have a brand new idea or invent something radically different in order to create difference? No, not necessarily. Starbucks didn’t invent coffee, and Apple didn’t invent the smartphone; these companies simply created new experiences of them, which in turn created a whole new set of meanings that we attached to what were once commodities.
  • Today the shortcut to more is to matter. It isn’t the person with the best idea who wins; it’s the person who has the greatest understanding of what really matters to people.
  • Perhaps it’s time to get comfortable with the fact that if we want to change the world, we need to stop being afraid to tell better true stories. Maybe the time has come to stop trying to convince people and to invest time instead in showing them what we stand for, so that they can choose the stories and brands they want to believe in.
  • The truth is that people don’t fall in love with ideas at all. They fall in love with how those ideas, products, services and places make them feel.
  • When you go the extra mile, people will know, and that knowing changes everything about how they feel about what you do. Emotional points of difference, the things that are less obvious and sometimes not even articulated, matter.
  • When return on investment is measured by delight instead of sales or conversions, there’s a lot more freedom to be creative, to be bold, or maybe even to be creative and bold.
  • You might not be able to change how the world values your profession, but you can change how you are valued by doing work that matters. Work that changes how people feel, not just what they think. We have two choices. We can stand around looking at the train wreck of what was, or we can design our own futures.
  • Love. It turns out that what applies to creating great drama, good storytelling, and life also applies to business. We sometimes forget that.
  • We are living in a unique moment in time. An age where we can bring things to the world without having to own a factory or an office building. A digital age that gives us more opportunities to really listen and to learn how to see what people are longing for.
  • If you want to make something new, start with understanding. Understanding what’s already present, and understanding the opportunities in what’s not. Most of all, understanding how it all fits together.
  • The truth is that what really moves us is feelings, not facts. There are a thousand ways for you to get noticed, but there’s only one way to really touch someone. And that’s to give them a reason to care, a story they can believe in. Great stories are woven, not told. They come to us in whispers, as goosebumps. A wry smile playing on our lips, a vigorous nod, a feeling we can’t explain. Or as a number scribbled on the back of a napkin, a shared link accompanied by a message that says, ‘you gotta see this’, which really means ‘I want you to experience this with me’.
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