Notes from Jeff Nyman’s “Test Description Language” blog post series

What is a test description language? How do we use that language to effectively write tests? In a series of blog posts, Jeff Nyman talks about what TDL is and how to write better tests with them. The posts are mostly written in the sense of how Cucumber checks are being used for writing tests for automation, but the lessons can also be applied in writing test cases if ever there is a need to write them for clients.

Some notes from the series of posts:

  • It’s very easy to confuse the essence of what you’re doing with the tools that you use.
  • Just because I’m using TestLink, Quality Center, QTP, Cucumber, Selenium, and so forth: that’s not testing. Those are tools that are letting me express, manage, and execute some of my tests. The “testing” part is the thinking I did ahead of time in discerning what tests to think about, what tests to write about, and so forth.
  • Testable means that it specifically calls out what needs to be tested.
  • When examples are the prime drivers, you are using the technique of specification by example and thus example-driven testing. When those examples cover business workflows, you are using the technique of scenario-based testing.
  • Requirements, tests, examples — they all talk about the same thing. They talk about how a system will behave once it’s in the hands of users.
  • The goal of a TDL (test description language) is to put a little structure and a little rigor around effective test writing, wherein “effective test writing” means tests that communicate intent (which correspond to your scenario title) and describe behavior (the steps of your scenario)
  • It is now, and always has been, imperative that we can express what we test in English (or whatever your common language is). This is a key skill of testers and this is a necessity regardless of the test tool solution that you use to manage and/or automate your testing.
  • So many tests, and thus so much development, falters due to a failure to do this simple thing: make sure the intent is clear and expressive for a very defined unit of functionality.
  • Software development teams are not used to the following ideas: The idea of testing as a design activity. The idea of test specifications that are drivers to development. The idea of effective unit tests that catch bugs at one of the most responsible times: when the code is being written.
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